Family together at the sofa.

Standing with partners across South Carolina and the nation, Children’s Trust is working to make sure that all of South Carolina’s kids get counted in the 2020 U.S. Census. Census data determine how much money South Carolina will get for a wide range of programs and services, including hospitals, child care programs and early education. An undercount of children will result in overcrowded classrooms, fewer child care options and busy hospital rooms.

Count everyone under your roof, including the kids

  • Count children in the home where they live and sleep most of the time, even if their parents do not live there.
  • If you just had a baby, and the baby is still in the hospital, count your baby at the home where he or she will live and sleep most of the time.
  • If children spend time in more than one home, count them where they stay most often.
  • If you are helping to take care of a friend’s or family member’s child, or the child does not have a permanent place to live, count the child if he or she is temporarily staying with you.

When in doubt, count kids where they are staying on April 1, 2020

Counting Young Children in the 2020 Census (PDF)

Family-With-Teenage-Daughters-Laying-Table-For-Meal-In-Kitchen

How to participate

By April 1, every home will receive an invitation to participate in the 2020 Census.

You have three options for responding:

  • Online
  • Phone
  • Mail

In mid-March, households will begin receiving official Census Bureau mail with detailed information on how to respond.

Learn how to participate

Standing with partners across the state and the nation

Children’s Trust is working to make sure that all of South Carolina’s kids get counted in the 2020 U.S. Census. Census data determine how much money South Carolina will get for a wide range of programs and services, including hospitals, child care programs and early education. In March, homes began receiving invitations to complete the 2020 Census.

Once the invitation arrives, you should respond in one of three ways: online, by phone, or by mail. It is important for all homes to respond quickly to ensure there isn't an undercount, which could lead to a lack of crucial funding for programs and services that help support children and families.

South Carolina Census facts

  • South Carolina received $12.7 billion in 2016 in federal funding that relied upon census data.
  • 20% did not respond to the Census, leading to about 18,000 people undercounted.
  • Children of color, children under the age of five, children in foster care, and children in non-traditional housing situations are most likely to be undercounted in South Carolina.

Learn who’s at risk for being undercounted

Urban Institute Census artwork

Making sure your community counts

  1. Share the information. Get your personal and professional networks engaged.
  2. Train your staff.
  3. Provide ongoing information to the people you service.
  4. Serve as a hub for Census information.
  5. Connect to your complete count committee and other local Census efforts.
  6. Start your own community Census work.

See how your community counted in the last census

South Carolina Office of the Governor Complete Count Committee

Find the complete County Committee in your area

Response Outreach Area Mapper

Census resources

For more information

Bett Farrell Williams
Chief Communications Officer

Due to concerns surrounding the coronavirus/COVID-19, Children’s Trust is moving events to virtual platforms or postponing to a more suitable time. Please check your event listings or inquire with the appropriate staff person. View our events.